3 Major mistakes business owners make with financial reporting

 

“Stay on top of your finances. Don’t leave that up to others”

Leif Garrett – USA singer and TV personality

Many business owners I meet tell me that their external accountants do their monthly accounts. In fact, one owner had his external accountant and his book keeper on site each week, and another waited 3 months to get his monthly profit and loss statement (P&L) which he didn’t look at anyway.

Did they provide financial reports that helped these owners manage their businesses?

This depends on the type of reports being created.

However, the answer is almost always………NO

What is usually provided is a service to input financial data and/or accounting services required for taxation purposes, that is to meet compliance requirements. The owners would then be given a profit and loss (P&L) statement, showing consolidated revenue less total costs to determine the profit.

Why is this a problem?

This is a problem because these P&Ls are not an operational P&Ls. This brings me to one of my favourite issues with managing businesses. The financial results that are being currently reported do not help in operating the business.

In my experience, there are 3 mistakes business owners make in financial reporting:

  1. Incorrectly categorised costs

Many businesses do not understand the difference between fixed, variable and overhead costs. Furthermore, external accountants generally do not categorise those costs as this is not required for compliance or taxation purposes. For example, it is important to know what your direct or variable costs are which vary with output or sales revenue. By not categorising costs correctly and having them in the correct section of the accounts, you cannot determine your gross margin, sometimes called your cost of goods sold (COGS) and net margin …….which leads to the next mistake…..

  1. Reports do not reflect operational needs

When costs and revenue are not placed in correct place, they will not help operationally. By consolidating costs rather than categorising them, a manager or business owner cannot easily determine which costs increase and decrease with changes in sales, or what their overheads are for operating the business.  It is essential to understand and identify each of the different costs and how they vary with activity. Often a single business has various components or different activities that make up the total business. In one of the examples above, the business was actually three different businesses, second hand vehicle sales, vehicle servicing and second-hand motor vehicle parts sales. This business owner’s revenues were consolidated and he did not know which activity was profitable and which was not…………..which leads to the next mistake…..

  1. Not knowing which parts of the business are profitable

So, did the business owner know if selling second had cars was profitable or whether it was worthwhile to continue to provide motor vehicle servicing?

No.

Therefore, the first step is to identify the different business activities. Once this is done, divide the revenue by activity and then assign to the different business units. For example, second hand car sales, spare parts sales and motor vehicle servicing.

The next step is to categorise the costs by type, variable or direct costs, indirect costs and overheads. Then assign these costs into business units. Overheads will be assigned to the consolidated business, with the P&L looking like this:

By reviewing the P&L, the business owner can see that Spare Parts is losing money and vehicle servicing has a Gross Margin of 63% and is the most profitable with a Net Margin of 48%. Furthermore, Overheads are 18% of Revenue, which would seem high and may warrant further investigation. As Spare Parts is losing $25,000 per year, possible managerial actions could be to increase prices or cease selling Spare Parts as a business activity which would result in an additional $25,000 in profit.

These are examples of what a good management or operations P&L looks like and how managers and business owners can make informed decisions.

Remember there are 3 mistakes in financial reporting:

  • Costs are incorrectly categorised
  • Reports do not reflect operational needs
  • Not knowing which parts of the business are profitable

As a manager or business owner is your operational P&L provided in a format you can use to improve your business’ performance?