Do you a have business risk management plan?

16. Example of Risk Matrix V4

‘The kinds of errors that cause plane crashes are invariably errors of teamwork and communication.

 Malcolm Gladwell – Canadian author and journalist

Being in business is a risk, and it is a challenge for businesses to manage that risk. Risk varies from business to business, from industry to industry and from country to country. Every business will have inherent risks. A business that handles cash, for example, is more susceptible to theft than a quarrying business with stockpiles of raw materials.

What is business risk?

It is an event or situation that has a negative effect on your business. This can range from additional costs caused by the risk to situations that threaten the business itself. Risks can never be completely eliminated. However, they can be managed and controlled.

There are two broad types of risk:

  • internal risks that are primarily related to what happens inside the business
  • external risks where events and actions affect the business from the outside.

As business owners and managers, it is our responsibility to manage business risk. For example, workplace safety is a managerial responsibility and a serious incident can have a substantial negative impact on the business.

How can business risks be identified?

  • The first step is identifying all the risks that could potentially negatively affect the business. Discuss these initially with the management team, dividing them into internal and external risks. For example, in a mining company, external risks could include country or sovereign risk, weather risk, exchange rate risk and economic risk. Internal risks could include operational risk, safety, people, customers, events such as power outages and fire, and reputational risks.
  • The second step, after identifying the risks, is to assess each of the risks. In my experience, the most effective method is to develop a risk matrix where severity or consequence is rated against the likelihood of the event occurring. Effective communication and consultation with the management team and other stakeholders will improve the quality of the risk assessment. For example, involve an expert in IT to help assess the risk of data breaches and system breakdowns.

Risk Management Matrix

  • The third step, after assessing and ranking the risks, is to develop a risk management plan. There is an international standard (IEC/ISO 31010for risk management, which covers identification, analysis, evaluation, monitoring and reviewing risk. This process is very detailed and involves other disciplines such as finance, safety and human resources.

The management of risks falls into four main areas:

  1. Avoidance – eliminate the risk. A good example is decommissioning dangerous machinery.
  2. Reduce – actions that mitigate the risk. In warehousing, where the risks of manual handling injuries are high, place limits on carton weights and have regular ‘toolbox’ safety meetings to reinforce the importance of using equipment safely and reporting heavy or awkward stock items.
  3. Share – transfer, insure or outsource. Some obvious examples include insuring against events such as fire and accidents, and outsourcing transport services to a third party who have managerial expertise in this area.
  4. Retain – accept the risk and have a plan to manage it. In transport, this could include improved selection of drivers, driver training and ensuring vehicles are maintained to the highest standard.

The risk management plan should have the identified risks listed in a risk register. It should include the following:

  1. Responses – actions to mitigate the risk
  2. Contingency plan – plan if mitigation strategy fails
  3. Risk rating – severity, likelihood and residual
  4. Trigger – what is likely to trigger the risk occurring
  5. Owner-manager or person responsible.

Although not all risks can be eliminated – and some risks are inherent in the industry or business – having a plan, monitoring and reviewing the risks regularly, and updating the plan when required is good practice. The collapse of McAleese Transport  is an example of how poor management of mitigating risks can have severe implications on a business and its employees. In conclusion, the risk management plan should include a crisis management plan.

What are the risks in your business?

Can you categorise the risks easily into consequence and likelihood?

Are they in your risk management plan?

A lesson in taking information at face value.

“Get your facts first, then you can distort them as you please”

Mark Twain – American author and humorist

Many years ago we were staying with some distant relatives in the Orkney Islands. Our visit became a lesson in not taking alleged ‘facts’ at face value.

Over a few drinks we were asked: “Have you heard of the island of St Kilda?”

No.

This sparked our interest as at the time we were living in the Melbourne bayside suburb of St Kilda. The local Australian Rules Football club were called ‘the Saints’ with a saint as their emblem.

Was the suburb named after a Christian saint?

No.

St Kilda is a group of wind swept, isolated and now uninhabited islands in the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. The main island of Hirta, until 1930 had been inhabited for hundreds of years and was a breeding ground for millions of seabirds, from gannets, puffins to fulmars.

It appears that the word St Kilda is derived from the Norse or Vikings ‘sunt kelda’ meaning ‘sweet well water’ and was not named after a Christian saint. I could guarantee that very few if any St Kilda Football Club supporters would know that there was never a saint called St Kilda.

Our relatives gave us a book to read about the history of St Kilda. It was a fascinating story about a group of islanders who had a hunter gatherer lifestyle. During the summer and spring months the men gathered sea birds, collecting them for feathers for pillows and bedding, and oil to sell to the occasional passing ship.  They clambered up and down the 300 or more metre cliffs in bare feet – assisted by large prehensile toes allowing them to climb on the cliffs more easily.

Was the suburb of St Kilda named after the islands of St Kilda?

Not exactly.

In the 1840s a trading ship called ‘The Lady of St Kilda’ was anchored in Melbourne for many months. The area was referred to locally as ‘The St Kilda foreshore.’ Legend has it, that the then Governor La Trobe named the new village St Kilda.

Not from a Saint, or an island but a ship.

However, the ship had a link to the islands of St Kilda. The owner of the ship, Sir Thomas Dyke Acland named the ship to commemorate a visit to the island of St Kilda by his wife, Lydia, in 1810. Acland had named the vessel in honour of Lady Grange, the wife of a Jacobite Noblemen, who in 1734 who was about to reveal her husband’s treachery. She was imprisoned on St Kilda for 17 years. It is hard to imagine how the noblewoman endured years of living alone in extremely primitive conditions in a stone dwelling with an earthen floor, amongst a small local population who spoke no English (the islanders spoke Gaelic) in the island’s harsh climate and lifestyle.

What are the management lessons from the St Kilda story?

As managers we should never accept things at face value as what are believed to be ‘facts’ may not be true. This could affect how we effectively manage the many situations that arise in the course of our managerial responsibilities. Furthermore, it is important to be curious, do your homework and ask questions.  Looking back on my career, at times I certainly have been guilty of not heeding this advice.

If you would like read a book about the history of St Kilda (not the Australian Rules Football Club), the book below is recommended.

“Island on the Edge of the World: The Story of St. Kilda,” by Charles Maclean

If it’s not written down, it didn’t happen!

“If it is not written down, it does not exist.”

Philippe Kruchten –  Academic and software engineer

If it is not written down it didn’t happen. Now that’s a big statement.

Does this sound absurd?

Is it the truth?

Many years ago, I was listening to a recording of oral family history. It was claimed by a distant cousin that her father (my great grandfather) met the bushranger Thunderbolt (bushrangers were outlaws and highwaymen) as a young boy. Thunderbolt arrived unexpectedly early one morning on his father’s small land holding in the New England district of NSW. The story goes that Thunderbolt joined them for breakfast and while having breakfast he kept looking nervously out the window. Thanking them for their hospitality he gave them a gold sovereign, mounted his horse and rode off. Not long afterwards some mounted police arrived.  Apparently, this occurred in 1864. When I checked the dates, I found that my great grandfather was not born until 1866 and Thunderbolt was in jail in 1864. Although the event probably happened, it did not happen in 1864.

There is business lesson here that should not be under estimated.

My advice is to write down and record the most important things.

If a legal issue arises, the written word is far more reliable than someone’s recollection. It is important particularly with issues of people management and workplace health and safety.

Let me give you an example.

As a young manager in my mid 20s, I was managing a concrete plant in Canberra. The fleet of owner drivers continuously threatened and intimidated me. It was an unusual situation when looked at through today’s eyes. The drivers were independent businessmen, who owned a concrete truck. This was the same for four other ready-mix concrete companies also operating in Canberra. Despite being businessmen, the owner drivers were all members of a trade union. With the union’s assistance they restricted the number of trucks operating, thereby restricting competition and increasing the rates they could charge.

It was a business cartel restricting competition.  It was not a legally or government sanctioned cartel such as taxi plate licences. The construction industry was booming and the capacity to deliver concrete was restricted, adversely affecting the construction industry. The situation deteriorated to a point where driver’s representative in our business tried to tell us when and to who we could deliver concrete.

This was clearly illegal under the Trade Practices Act. Businesses were not allowed to collude and restrict competition and increase prices. This “arrangement” was adversely affecting our customers. On several occasions I was confronted and threatened. Having some knowledge of the law and knowing that this ‘arrangement’ was probably illegal, when threatened I quoted back that what they were doing was illegal. I then noted it in my work diary.

More than three years after I had left the business, I received a call from the company’s lawyer. The new CEO had decided to use Canberra as a test case to initially overturn the “arrangements” and then use it as a precedent in the state of NSW, to break up the arrangements there. Luckily, I had kept my work diaries and when called as a court witness, was able to quote the times, dates and conversations. The company won the court case and the cartel arrangement that had been supported by the union was quashed.

This outcome demonstrates the importance of recording events, as the diary entries were one of main reasons the court case was won. Too often in business, we are busy and fail to record important events only to find out later, that they should have been. The ready-mix drivers’ case was an important learning experience for me.

Employee issues such as performance management and safety requirements are areas which are important, and discussions and events must be recorded. Our memories cannot be relied upon as we cannot remember dates, times and actual conversations.

The Thunderbolt story illustrates the unreliability of oral history and memory. As managers, writing down important things is not optional. Many of us hate paperwork, however it is an essential part of our job.

What should you as a manager be recording?

Where should you file these records?

 

How NOT to celebrate Christmas…

“Every Who down in Whoville liked Christmas a lot

But the Grinch who lived just North of Whoville did not!

The Grinch hated Christmas! The whole Christmas season!

Now, please don’t ask why. No one quite knows the reason.

It could be, perhaps, that his shoes were too tight.

It could be his head wasn’t screwed on just right”

From the book “How the Grinch Stole Christmas!” by Dr Suess (Theodor Geisel)

So, what relevance does a children’s book of rhyme about a grumpy, solitary creature who tries to end Christmas by stealing Christmas-themed items from the homes of a nearby town Whoville have for managers?

In previous Christmas blogs, topics covered  included the need to have rules on behaviour, the importance of taking the opportunity to celebrate, thank staff and display leadership as well as a time for renewal and evaluation and setting the tone for the next year

John Cleese the famous comedian and Antony Jay one of the authors of TV show “Yes Minister” made a fortune from training videos that emphasised what not to do. With the large number of articles on management and leadership easily available today, I find it inconceivable that managers still display appalling examples of how not to do things. In these times where communication is spread quickly through social media it is even more important to ensure communication to staff in particular, is considered and done carefully.

This year I was sent a copy of the following Christmas notice posted on a company notice board.

From the text it would appear there have been problems of behaviour at the company’s Christmas parties in the past. As a manager, what do you think of this Christmas message to staff?

Here are some questions to ponder…

What is the underlying message in this Christmas notice?

Is it positive?

Would this communication help lift employees’ morale and get them working to improve performance?

What tone is set for the future?

What do you think of this company’s culture?

Do you think that culture effects profitability?

Between January 2016 and late 2019, the price of the commodity this business mines rose 40%, however in two of these years this company made losses and did not pay a dividend. Anecdotally it would appear that culture could be a contributing factor to less than satisfactory financial performance.

My advice to managers and business owners is “don’t be a Grinch-like at Christmas”. It is traditionally period of goodwill. Celebrate the occasion display graciousness, thank your staff and their families…

Take advantage of the opportunity, provide hope for the future and display leadership.

And to all the readers of this blog, thank you for subscribing and I wish you and your families the compliments of the Season and best wishes for the New Year.

What is Koala Bear Syndrome?

Flea-ridden, piddling, stinking, scratching, rotten little things”

John Brown – Australian Minister for Tourism

In the 1980s, the Tourism Minister sparked a national outcry when he described the koala bear in a such disparaging way. Koalas are considered a national animal icon in Australia with overseas tourist seeking to view and be photographed holding them. Koalas are not actually bears, but are mammal marsupials (have pouches) and are protected by law.

Koalas are found in the eucalyptus forests of eastern Australia and feast exclusively on eucalyptus leaves, which are tough and not very nutritious. They are covered in grey fur, weigh up to 14 kilograms, have strong clawed feet suitable for climbing and living in trees and are universally considered ‘cute’. Their poor diet means that they get little energy, needing to eat up to one kilogram of leaves per day. They are very docile and sleep up to 18 hours per day. The koala’s brain is very small, and they are considered the least intelligent mammal in the world. In summary the koala is protected, considered ‘cute’, not very intelligent, docile and not very productive.

The concept of the Koala Bear Syndrome© (KBS©) has been developed from a lifetime of work experiences in a range of businesses. Fellow workers often referred to some of their peers, colleagues and bosses as “marsupials”.

They didn’t have pouches, so why call them marsupials?

Because like most marsupials in Australia they appeared to be a “protected species’ and displayed such characteristics as being chronic under performers who could say and do anything without bearing the consequences or being held accountable. However, I consider the characteristics of the koala a better description of such people, particularly those who produce little, under perform, lack energy, are lazy, continually made the same mistakes, are incompetent and more importantly appear to be protected by their managers. They are rarely held to account. Koala bears are another form of disruptive employee, although they are more likely to be less obvious.

Sadly, few organisations are completely free from KBS©. We all have our blind spots and the challenge is to be self-aware enough to recognise them. Looking back, there are times when I have allowed KBS© to exist by failing to recognise it. KBS© tends to manifest itself more in private family companies, where business owners are more emotionally involved and where family members are not held to the same standards as other employees. Employing relatives and friends is also another area where KBS© is more likely exit.

Are there koala bears in your organisation?

How do you recognise them and what are you going to about it?

Value statements, structured performance appraisals, codes of conduct and clear and strong leadership can assist in managing KBS©.

Management lessons from the fall of the Berlin Wall…

“The Wall will be standing in 50 and even in 100 years”

Erich Honecker – East German head of state, January 19th 1989

Almost thirty years ago, the Berlin Wall came down. The Berlin Wall was a guarded concrete barrier that cut off West Berlin from the surrounding Communist State of East Germany. Over 140 kilometres long, it was built in 1961 to prevent East Germans from escaping to West Berlin. From the early 1950s to 1961, nearly 20% of the East German population left the country for West Germany.

On 9th November 1989, with crowds mounting in East Berlin the East German authorities announced the end of travel restrictions and opened up several checkpoints for visits to West Berlin.  Thousands swept through the checkpoints. Soon Berliners from the East and West began dancing on top of the wall and breaking off pieces of the wall. The fall of the Berlin Wall triggered a revolutionary wave that ultimately redrew the map of Europe, bringing down the Iron Curtain and setting millions of people free. Within two years, the Soviet Union and its empire also fell.

For 28 years the wall kept people in, and kept people out, separating and dividing families and friends, dividing Germany and the European continent. Over 5,000 people had escaped over this time and sadly an estimated 200 plus people died trying to escape from East Berlin to West Berlin. No one tried to escape from the West to the East.

My father believed that he would never see the dismantling of the Berlin Wall in his lifetime. I can clearly remember him saying this to us at the family Christmas in 1989. The current thinking at the time was that Communism’s rise was inevitable. Very few ‘experts’ predicted or expected that eventually Communism would collapse, let alone so quickly, and that Russia would lose its status as a world super-power.

What are the three management lessons from the fall of the Berlin Wall?

  1. The power of a vision. On 12th June 1987 US President Ronald Reagan stood at the Brandenburg Gate and demanded “Mr. Gorbachev, tear down this wall.” His words were largely ignored by the international media. Many so-called foreign policy experts dismissed Reagan’s demand as naïve and sensationalist.

There are few things more powerful for a business than having a clear and concise vision. Amazon’s vision is “To be Earth’s most customer-centric company, where customers can find and discover anything they might want to buy online, and endeavours to offer its customers the lowest possible prices”. Amazon’s current market penetration and size is testament to their vision.

  1. Things can get better rather than worse. The worst-case scenario may not happen, particularly when people put their minds to achieving positive change. Very often we are subjected to negative media stories. We regularly hear people spreading such sentiments inside organisations.

Never under estimate what positive outcomes can be achieved with great leadership and teamwork. Everyday we are subjected to non-positive messages that make us believe our future is not in our hands. Like the East Berliners in 1989, by believing that we can escape from a prison-like environment, whether physical or mental, we can set ourselves free and make positive change.  The dismantling of the Berlin Wall is a reminder of how the seemingly impossible can became the inevitable and if there is the will to make it happen.

  1. Predicting the future is dangerous. Sadly, we tend to lean on so-called ‘experts’ who advise us and write books predicting the future. However, the fall of the Berlin Wall and the associated collapse of Communism caught almost everyone by surprise. We should be sceptical of people who claim they can predict the future.

In the late 1800s The Times predicted that “In 50 years, every street in London will be buried under nine feet of manure”. This became known as the “Great Horse Manure Crisis of 1894”.  The invention of the motor transport and Henry Ford’s assembly line production of motorcars at affordable prices changed this ‘expert’ prediction. By 1912, less than 20 years after this prediction there were more cars than horses in London. Furthermore, they were cheaper to own and use than a horse.

What are the 3 concluding messages from the fall of the Berlin Wall?

  • Change is evitable.
  • Things do not remain the same.
  • Whatever you are doing today will not be good enough for the future.

Certainly, the failure of Communism to adapt and change assisted in its downfall. This is the same for organisations. Many of the great corporations of times past no longer exist.

So, what is your business doing to recognise the evitability of change?

What should you be changing so your business not only survives but thrives?

Is an annual budget really all that important?

“The budget is not just a collection of numbers, but an expression of our values and aspirations”

Jack Lew – US Secretary of the Treasury

Many small businesses (SMEs) do not have annual budgets. In fact, I have come across some multi-million dollar businesses that do not have budgets, including several of my past clients.

What is a business budget?

A business budget is ‘a financial plan and prediction of future revenue and expenditure’. A budget is a goal for the business over the next 12 months.

Why are budgets important?

They serve a goal, or a plan…with 3 main purposes:

  • To forecast income and expenditure, and by extension profitability; (i.e. where are the costs incurred and where does the revenue come from to make a profit)
  • A tool for decision making that establishes a financial framework for the decision-making process, and assists in determining courses of action that can be either planned or unplanned over the year.
  • To monitor and measure business performance, where the actual business performance is measured against the forecast business performance.

In simple terms, all good businesses MUST have an annual budget, otherwise management and staff will not know what is expected of them, or the business.

How should budgets be compiled?

There are two main ways of compiling a budget; top down or bottom up:

  1. Top down is the less rigorous way of setting budgets and is more suitable for very small businesses. Often last years’ results are reviewed, and a percentage is added to revenue and costs for the following year.
  2. Bottom up entails reviewing costs, customers, revenue, sales and other Profit and Loss (P&L) items at a micro-level and determining what can be and what is likely to be achieved next year.

In my experience based on having my own business and on feedback from my clients, bottom up budgeting is the best method. It is important to invest the time in creating a comprehensive and realistic budget as it will be easier to manage and ultimately more effective than top down budgeting.

What are the suggested steps?

  1. Involve the right people, including financial, sales and operational staff. Their involvement will help gain their commitment to meeting the budget.
  2. Ask them for their estimates on sales, production costs or specific projects based on first principles by referring to each line item and customer in the P&L.
  3. Rigorously question each assumption, get agreement and then a commitment from those team members who are responsible for each part of the business. Ask questions such as:
    • Which customers will increase their purchases next year?
    • Where and how can we increase sales?
    • Will we be able to increase prices?
    • How can we reduce our fixed costs?
    • What staff will get pay increases next year?
  4. Use last year’s figures as a guide only, and do not simply make broad estimates from these figures.
  5. Complete the budget and share it with key staff.

In conclusion, the compiling of the annual budget is an opportunity to review and understand the business more thoroughly. A budget provides structure for the next 12 months, imposes discipline and holds people accountable for the business’ performance. What resources are required? How many staff are required? What customers are the most profitable? Where can we reduce overheads and still increase sales?

Overall budgets must be realistic and achievable and should also be aspirational and not too easy to achieve. A budget should have ‘stretch targets’, to ensure the business grows. In all my years in business, I have never set a budget where revenue or sales were less than the previous year.

6 Ways to Grow Your Business

Guest Blog by Kym Wallis

As a business owner, you’re probably always on the look-out for new ways to grow your business.

There’s a lot of competition out there. Consumers have a lot of choice. So if you want your business to grow, you need to outshine the competition.

How can you do this?

Here are 6 effective ways to grow your business:

1. Build a brand identity

Consumers today have more choices than ever before. That means that, if you want to successfully grow your business, you need to develop a brand identity that’s unique and appealing to your potential customer base.

Remember, you don’t need to try and compete with big companies. If you want to add value to your customers, you should focus on finding what’s special about your business.

What does your business stand for? Who are your customers? And how can you help them?

Once you’ve established this, you can focus on building your identity and applying this across everything you do. From your marketing efforts, to the design of your website, being consistent is key if you want to grow your business successfully.

2. Focus on customer service

Word of mouth is one of the most powerful ways of growing sales. When a potential customer is deciding whether to purchase from you, one of the first things they are likely to check is feedback and reviews from others.

That means that, if you’re trying to grow your business, focusing on customer satisfaction is a must.

The first step is to understand your customers’ needs. Who are your customers? What are their problems, and how can you solve them?

You should always be looking for feedback so you can find out where you can improve. Always be looking to expand on your levels of service so that your customer has the best possible experience.

3. Promote customer loyalty

It’s nearly always cheaper to keep an existing customer than it is to attract a new one. Promoting customer loyalty should be of high priority if you’re trying to grow your business.

Make sure that you look after your existing customer base. Stay in contact via newsletter, social media, or other channels. And make sure you’re keeping your customers informed when it comes to promotional offers and discounts on products.

4. Be realistic about completing tasks

When you’re running your own business, it can be very easy to become overwhelmed. With so many tasks to complete, it’s important to prioritise your tasks and manage your time properly.

It’s also important to recognise that you can’t do everything yourself. Sometimes you won’t have the time, the skills, or the resources to complete a certain task.

If this is the case, it can be beneficial to outsource some of your tasks to third-parties or freelancers. This will free up time, so that you can focus on growing your business.

5. Use an omnichannel approach

The rising popularity of online and mobile shopping means that, when it comes to shopping, consumers today expect to have more options.

Mobile shopping is the fasting growing channel. It offers a multitude of benefits for customers and businesses alike, like being more convenient and freeing up time to do other things.

However, there are still benefits to a traditional, offline shopping experience. For example, a lot of customers still value being able to look at a product in the flesh, try it out, and test it.

That’s why, for businesses that are trying to grow, it’s best to take an omnichannel approach. Doing this ensures you take advantage of the benefits of both online and offline sales. Combining platforms can help you to maximise results.

For example, customers can find the best deals online, then finalise their purchase offline, or the reverse. It gives more flexibility, and gives you the opportunity for more up-selling and cross-selling of products.

6. Social media marketing

If you’re trying to grow your business, being able to reach as many potential customers as possible is essential.

That’s where social media marketing comes in. Social media platforms give you a huge audience, and allow you to reach a large number of people instantly.

You can use it to communicate effectively with your existing customers. You can also use it to listen to feedback or complaints and see where you need to improve.

In addition to this, you can use it to promote your products or services and reach out to potential new customers, or to re-target previous customers.

One of the ways you can do this is through Facebook paid ads. These ads let you target customers based on location, gender, age, interests, pages they have liked, browsing habits, or various other criteria. This is a cost effective and easy to use marketing tool.

Author’s Bio

Kym Wallis, the founding director of Higher Ranking has over 15 years of advertising sales, digital strategy, and business development experience. He is currently working as Digital Adviser for Colourtech.

Is success a matter of luck?

“Luck is where preparation meets opportunity”

Jack Gibson – legendary Rugby League Coach

Unfortunately, too often these days we hear, that success is due to luck. Whether in the ‘old’ media or social media we hear the same story line – success is a matter of luck.

Is it really the case that success is a matter of luck?

Perhaps all we need to do is visit Zimbabwe and get an appointment with Dr Mulongo , a witch doctor or In’yanga. We could ask that a spell be lifted to initiate number 9 in list of the problems listed above that she claims she can solve, by ‘removing bad lucky’!

As a dare, on a visit to Bulawayo several years ago, I did visit Dr Mulongo and asked her whether she could assist the Wallabies, the Australian Rugby side to win more matches by casting a spell on their opposition. Sadly, since this visit their performance has deteriorated, especially against the All Blacks.

Contrast this approach with the late Jack Gibson, a legendary coach in Australia in Rugby League from the late 1960s to the mid- 1980s. He was known for his economy of words, and his notable and laconic quotes that showed great wisdom and are still referred to today.

Gibson was totally unafraid of relegating ‘big name’ players who did not perform. As the first coach to use computers to evaluate player performance, he introduced new innovations into the sport of Rugby League from other sports, including American football and basketball. He was a great proponent of careful planning and high levels of fitness and effectively changed the game to become more professional. This led to 5 consecutive premierships with 2 clubs.

During my period of over 20 years in business, there were many times where people considered that luck made it successful. However, I do not believe in luck creating success. Like Jack Gibson, I believe that luck is where preparation meets opportunity. You make your own luck through sound leadership, preparation and hard work.

In the early years we were reliant on one of Australia’s largest retailers for over 80% of our business. We worked hard to build a close working relationship with them, focusing on them as a customer and exceeding their expectations. When they changed their distribution model, introduced electronic commerce and forcing suppliers to prepare their merchandise ‘store ready’, that is picked and packed with an electronic invoice for each store, we were ideally positioned to take advantage of this opportunity.

We worked with the retailer converting their suppliers into our customers. Once converted we worked hard at being ‘customer responsive’ and provided high level ‘hands on’ customer service. The business did not look back and many of these customers remained with the business until it was sold over 15 years later.

What are 3 lessons from this story?

  1. You make your own luck. This is done by being prepared, understanding your customers needs and the requirements and changes in the market place. If you are prepared you are in a prime position to take advantages of any opportunities that may arise.

This is how in the above example we were able to take advantage of the change in retailer-supplier relations.

  1. There is no substitute for hard work. As I tell my children, the only place where reward comes before work is in the dictionary Success comes from preparation, working hard, learning from your mistakes and never giving up.

In this example, when 80% of our business was leaving due to the change in the supplier relationship, our hard work with the retailer gave us the opportunity to work with them and convert their suppliers to become our customers.

  1. Focus on the customer. Customers are the lifeblood of any business. Without them you have no business. Focus on their needs, engage with them, meet them regularly, continually seek out their requirements and constantly remind them that you are looking after their interests.

By focusing on the major retailer who was our customer, we developed a constructive working relationship where they were able to recommend our services to their suppliers.

As a business owner or manager, is your style to believe in Dr Mulongo’s witch craft to ‘remove bad lucky’?

Or is your style more like the legendary Rugby League coach Jack Gibson, where careful planning and hard work leads to success?

How to Create Powerful Business Strategies that Improve Your Chances of Success

Guest Blog by Kym Wallis

Regardless of the industry or business model you choose, setting up a successful company is very challenging. Aside from logistical and financial obstacles, you’ll also have to create a brand that speaks to your target audience. And, even if you do everything right, there’s a chance the market itself can change, which may require some action on your behalf. This means that you have to be flexible and make the right adjustments to secure a great outcome.

With this in mind, most entrepreneurs and business owners can increase their chances of achieving success by creating a comprehensive business strategy. This can serve as the blueprint for their business and remind you of the goals you set out at the beginning.

Creating a business plan is necessary, but it’s not simple. Let’s go over a few tips to help you create a powerful strategy for your company.

1. Why Should All Companies Have a Business Plan?

A few decades ago, terms like business plan and marketing strategy were only relevant in large corporations with huge budgets. Today, having a business plan is a critical requirement for all companies.

From local stores to tech companies that provide online services, having a strategy for your business can bring a number of benefits. By thinking strategically you can identify priorities, measure the right success metrics, and get a general overview of your business.

2. How to Create a Powerful Business Strategy

Creating a plan for your business may sound simple. But, you need to take your time and collect all the information you need to make an informed decision. Here are some tips to help you put together a business strategy with good chances of success.

3. Write Out Your Goals and Objectives

Aside from staying profitable, all companies need to have a clear set of objectives. Remember, the more specific they are, the easier it will be to stay on track.

4. Design a Plan that Can Be Adjusted

As mentioned before, all entrepreneurs need to keep an eye on the trends that shape the industry they work in. Likewise, you should design a flexible strategy that can be adjusted even in the most unlikely scenarios.

5. Be Realistic

Setting realistic objectives and being reserved about your projections will help set up your company for success. In case you underperform, you’ll be able to follow the contingency plan you set up. If you’re successful, then you’ll be pleasantly surprised.

6. Technology and Innovation Are a Must

There’s no denying that today’s world is driven by technology and innovation. From mobile devices to ultra-fast connection speeds, business owners need to consider how these technologies will affect their organisation.

7. Create a Robust Marketing Plan

Marketing has become a pivotal part of all successful businesses. But, modern advertising goes way beyond billboards and television ads.

Today, launching a marketing campaign means creating a holistic ecosystem that revolves around user experience. Make sure you create a robust marketing plan that allows you to build your brand and attract the customers that generate the highest revenue.

8. Study Your Audience

Whether you have a B2B company or serve consumers, knowing your audience will give you an advantage when it comes to creating a business strategy. You can collect information from a variety of sources, just make sure you prioritise demographic data as well as your targets’ interests.

9. Cultivate a Great Brand Image

Contrary to popular belief, most consumers prefer branded ads, which means you have to make an effort and cultivate a positive image. Besides marketing your product, also shine a light on your company and try to give your customers a good impression.

10. Find a Consultant You Can Trust

Creating a reliable business strategy is not easy, especially if it’s your first venture. The tips above can help you create a robust plan for your company and pave your way to success. If you want to learn more about our services and how they can complement your strategy, get in touch with us today and our team will be glad to help.

Author’s Bio

Kym Wallis, the founding director of Higher Ranking has over 15 years of advertising sales, digital strategy, and business development experience. He is currently working as Digital Adviser for PK Simpson. Kym has several other blogs on this website.